Air Conditioning Not Working on July 4th? | HVAC.com

Air Conditioning Not Working on July 4th? Try These Quick Fixes!

Posted on: July 4, 2019 | by: HVAC.com July 5, 2019

 

Independence Day weekend is finally here! People around the country spend this long weekend hosting barbeques, hitting the lake, enjoying the fireworks, or just relaxing at home thanks to the time off work. Temperatures throughout the United States get pretty hot on July 4th, so air conditioners are typically working very hard.

 

An air conditioner not working over 4th of July weekend is a nightmare no homeowner wants to face – whether you’re hosting a party or simply kicking back, no cooling is no one’s idea of a good time. Most heating and cooling companies are closed on July 4th due to the holiday – you may be left waiting days until your air conditioner can be fixed due to the upcoming weekend, or be stuck paying high emergency service call fees.

 

If your air conditioning system stops working on July 4th, don’t panic! Sometimes a simple solution is all you need to restore cooling. Before you call your HVAC contractor for emergency air conditioning repair, run through these air conditioning troubleshooting steps to see if you are able to get your air conditioner back up and running without the wait, discomfort, and expense!

 

Air Conditioner Troubleshooting for July 4th Cooling Problems

 

If your air conditioner won’t turn on, suddenly stops working, or doesn’t seem to be cooling your home enough, first try the air conditioner troubleshooting steps below to see if a DIY solution restores your indoor comfort. If they don’t, the problem is more complicated and requires professional help.

 

Help – My Air Conditioner Doesn’t Turn On!

 

If your air conditioner doesn’t turn on over the July 4th holiday, a power or control issue is a potential cause. These issues are often able to be resolved by the homeowner – if you know the right steps to take. Run through these air conditioner troubleshooting tips:

 

  • Check the power to the air conditioning system. Check your thermostat, as the batteries may have gone bad and require replacement so it is able to communicate with your AC equipment. Next, check your electrical panel to make sure no breakers have tripped or fuses blown, cutting power to your air conditioning equipment – check circuits that power your hardwired thermostat, outdoor condenser, and indoor air handling equipment. Next, check both your indoor and outdoor cooling system components to make sure their power switches have not been accidentally turned off – these are located on the equipment’s exterior or nearby on the wall.

 

  • Check your thermostat settings. Your thermostat settings tell the air conditioner when to come on and turn off. Make sure the thermostat’s cooling mode is selected. Make sure temperature settings are lower than the room’s current temperature – if they aren’t, the thermostat doesn’t tell the air conditioner to start a cooling cycle. Make sure your thermostat’s hold or vacation mode has not been selected – this overrides your regular temperature schedules, so your air conditioner is unable to turn on when you expect it.

 

  • Check your indoor equipment. Some air handlers and furnaces do not run if access doors are not tightly shut. This is a safety measure to prevent system damage and accidents. Make sure all access panels on your interior HVAC equipment are properly closed and have not come open.

 

Help – My Air Conditioner Coils Are Frozen!

 

If your air conditioner runs but no cooling is coming from your vents, an iced coil is sometimes to blame. This happens when the system doesn’t get enough airflow. You need to take steps to thaw the coil, and remedy the airflow obstruction.

 

To thaw your coil, follow these air conditioner troubleshooting instructions:

  • Go to the thermostat – turn the cooling system OFF, but turn the system fan ON. This moves air over the coils to help them thaw.
  • Access your evaporator coils, which are located within your HVAC system’s interior components.
  • Inspect your system’s drain pan – it’s going to take on some excess moisture as the coils thaw. Make sure it is not clogged so that water is able to flow through it. You may also put down a few towels to catch any overflow due to the heavy water volume and prevent water damage.
  • Check your condensate drain line. It’s connected to the outlet of your drain pan, and is a PVC pipe that carries water outside. Make sure there are no clogs in this line so water does not back up as your coils thaw.
  • Air conditioner coils take a while to thaw, anywhere from an hour up to 24 hours. If you need your coils thawed fast, you may use a hair dryer to speed up the process, just be sure to not overheat any of the air conditioner components.
  • Once all the ice has melted, replace the access door on your interior HVAC equipment and turn the cooling system back on at the thermostat.

 

As your coils thaw, investigate to find the source of the airflow obstruction in your system:

  • Furnace filter. Clogged furnace filters restrict air movement through your home and prevent the coils from receiving the airflow they need. If your filter is gray and covered in contaminants, replace it!
  • Condenser unit. This is the outdoor portion of the cooling system. It releases heat through the fins along the unit’s exterior. Make sure all grass clippings, mulch, leaves, and other yard debris are cleared off the fins. Make sure nothing is stored in the two-foot area around your condenser.
  • Condensate drain. Clogs in the drain pan or condensate drain line cause too much humidity in the HVAC system, a potential cause of iced coils. Inspect these components as mentioned above and clear any clogs if possible.
  • Refrigerant issues. Your system might have a refrigerant leak. If other steps do not solve the problem, call a local HVAC contractor to troubleshoot refrigerant issues.
  • If you are able to access your duct system, check them for disconnections which may prevent proper air movement in your HVAC system. Seal them to restore function now, but you will want to call an HVAC pro for further inspection and repair after the July 4th holiday.

 

Help – My Air Conditioner Isn’t Cooling Enough!

 

Is your air conditioner running but your home isn’t getting cool enough? Airflow issues may be to blame and are often a simple DIY fix. Check the following system components:

 

  • Thermostat settings. Make sure the cooling system is turned on at the thermostat and that the fan is set to AUTO, not ON. If the fan is set to ON, it runs all the time – even when your air conditioner isn’t cycling. This pushes warmer air out of your vents because the air is not being conditioned between cooling cycles.

 

  • Furnace filter. Clogged furnace filters restrict air movement through your home and prevent the coils from receiving the airflow they need. If your filter is gray and covered in contaminants, replace it!

 

  • Condenser unit. This is the outdoor portion of the cooling system. It releases heat through the fins along the unit’s exterior. Make sure all grass clippings, mulch, leaves, and other yard debris are cleared off the fins. Make sure nothing is stored in the two-foot area around your condenser. Also, make sure the condenser unit has power (instructions mentioned above). If power is cut to the condenser, the indoor blower components can run, but the condenser doesn’t – this means your air conditioner won’t produce cooling.

 

  • If there are areas in the home that feel warmer than others, check all vents to make sure airflow to the room is not restricted. Move all furniture, rugs, and other obstructions so they do not cover the vent. Some vents have louvers which allow you to open and shut them – make sure all vent louvers are open.

 

  • Disconnected sections and leaks in the duct system allow conditioned air to escape, so your living areas do not receive all the cool air your air conditioner produces. Look for gaps and disconnections – seal them now.

 

Find Emergency Air Conditioning Repair Help on HVAC.com

 

If your air conditioner still doesn’t work after AC troubleshooting, it’s time to call a local heating and cooling company for emergency help! Use our HVAC Contractor Directory to locate a cooling contractor near you who provides emergency AC repair service to fix your system over the holiday weekend.

 

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